Good news for the coding enthusiasts out-there. Research proves that learning to code has little to do with your math solving ability, and more to do with your language learning aptitude. The research concluded that math skills are an insignificant indicator of coding abilities. So, if you have ever been told not to pursue a career in programming because of your math scores, think again.

According to a recent research by University of Washington, natural aptitude for learning languages is a strong predictor of learning to program than basic math knowledge, or numeracy.

The research revealed that writing code involves learning a second language, an ability to learn that language’s vocabulary and grammar, and how they work together to communicate ideas and intentions.

 Published in the Scientific Reports journal, the research examined the neuro-cognitive abilities of over three dozen adults as they learned Python, a common programming language. Following a number of tests to assess their executive function, language and math skills, participants completed a series of online lessons and quizzes in Python. The participants who learned Python quicker, and with higher accuracy, tended to have a mix of strong problem-solving and language abilities.

Coding has foundation in human language and programming involves creating meaning by stringing symbols together in rule-based ways.

This is the first study to link both the neural and cognitive predictors of natural language aptitude to individual differences in learning programming languages.

Even though it is the first-of-its-kind, but the research is significant to understand that even if, an individual does not possess above-par math skills it does not mean that they cannot pursue a career in programming or other supposedly, empirical disciplines.

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