Pakistan ranked 154th in the world on a survey gauging the extent to which countries adhere to improving the provision of children rights. The KidsRights Index ranks countries who are a party to the United Nations (UN) Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and access their ability to work in different child-related domains.

The annual KidsRights rankings, compiled in collaboration with the Erasmus School of Economics in Rotterdam, uses UN data and provides crucial insights into what is being done and where countries need to do better to fully implement the CRC”. It includes five domains including the right to life, right to health, right to education, right to protection and enabling environment for child rights; along with a total of 20 indicators.

Pakistan secured 0,574 in life, 0,511 in health, 0,405 in education, 0,567 in protection and 0,643 in child rights environment, attaining an overall score of 0,492. Moreover, the value of missing indicators was equivalent to one.

Iceland topped the survey findings, followed by Portugal, Switzerland, Finland and Germany, while Afghanistan was declared the worst followed by Sierra Leone, Chad, Equatorial Guinea and the Central African Republic

The survey also revealed that Britain and New Zealand also failed in the provision of children rights, scoring lower scores than war-torn Syria and North Korea, regardless of their wealth in rankings. “Appalling discrimination against migrant children and a lack of legal protection for poorer youths in New Zealand and the United Kingdom,” led to lower rankings, pushing them at the bottom of the survey. Britain ranked 170th, while New Zealand secured 169th spot in the survey consisting of 181 countries.

Booming economic growth in countries including China, India, and Myanmar were also  lagging behind in the provision of children rights. However, countries like Thailand and Tunisia surprisingly performed well in the rankings, securing 14th and 15th, despite the limited set of resources at hand,  commented Marc Dulleart, founder and chairman of KidsRights.

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