For three hours on Friday, students will leave lessons and walk out to protest climate change, a move that has found support from head teachers.

 

Despite several high profile campaigns by top figures in Pakistan that have urged people to save natural resources like water and trees in order to limit the effects of climate change, little has changed on the ground. Water is increasingly becoming scarcer in Pakistan, and the former Supreme Court chief justice’s dam fund highlighted the importance of both building a dam and saving water. But Pakistanis seem to not care. Every day, millions of gallons of water is wasted to unnecessarily hose down cars, patios, verandahs and other objects that serve nothing but quench our people’s unending appetite for ostentation.

To really fight the effects of climate change and brazen wastage of natural resources, the people must realize and worry about the consequences. And that is exactly what is happening in England. The people are waking up to the possible horrors of climate change, with young school children leading the charge. Thousands of school children across England have called for a strike this Friday to raise a dissenting voice against and protest climate change. The protest has been planned by teenagers, who have called on their peers to walk out of lessons as a token strike to protest climate change. It is being dubbed the UK Youth Strike For Climate and is expecting participation from thousands of students on coming Friday between 11am and 2pm.

Students enrolled in schools in at least 27 towns and cities have vowed to participate in the protest, including those in Glasgow, Exeter, Cardiff and Brighton. For three hours on Friday, students will leave the lessons and walk out to protest climate change, a move that has found support from head teachers.

Pakistanis seem to not care. Every day, millions of gallons of water is wasted to unnecessarily hose down cars, patios, verandahs and other objects that serve nothing but quench our people’s unending appetite for ostentation

Britain’s National Association of Head Teachers praised the activism, with a statement saying, “When you get older pupils making an informed decision, that kind of thing needs to be applauded.”

“Society makes leaps forward when people are prepared to take action. Schools encourage students to develop a wider understanding of the world around them, a day of activity like this could be an important and valuable life experience,” the statement added.

While the planned protest has been prasied by many, there have been a few detractors. A former primary school teacher and now a member of parliament, William Wragg said students could learn far more about climate change in school than outside of it, while, former director of New Schools Network Toby Young said it was just “truanting”.

However, organizers of the protest shunned the criticism, saying they had been truly inspired by similar protests by students in Sweden.

Jake Woodier of the UK Youth Climate Coalition, which is involved in coordinating the strikes, said the message of “radical, urgent change” in the Swedish protests had resonated with young people in the UK.

Write A Comment