he worsening coronavirus crisis has led to the world resorting to drastic measures, including higher education institutes worldwide trying to implement all measures enlisted in the yet to be written book of what to do when crisis strikesAccording to a survey conducted and published by Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) on how universities are addressing the coronavirus outbreak, almost 50% of the universities around the world have switched to scheduled courses online.Furthermore, 19% have delayed the start dates for some courses until the following semester, 17% have changed application deadlines, deferred some of the 2020 admission offers to 2021, and 8% of the surveyed universities have even started conducting their own English language tests.However, 50% of the varsities are anticipating a detrimental impact on student admissions in the aftermath of the virus outbreak. Universities in the UK, for instance, are deeply concerned that coronavirus could leave them with too few applicants to stay financially viable.

According to BBC, emergency controls are being considered to stop a free-for-all in student recruitment. There is also a fear that more students might take a gap year since universities are uncertain whether they will be reopening campuses for the autumn semester or not.Moreover, universities are expecting a fall in the number of overseas applicants, making funding from home students highly important. The higher education watchdog, Universities UK, intervened to stop universities from making unconditional offers to students, as it was found that some were promising places regardless of grades.

At least 19% of the universities surveyed have delayed start dates for some courses until the following semester, 17% have changed application deadlines, deferred some 2020 admission offers to 2021, and 8% have even started conducting their own English language tests

At least 50% of the participants surveyed by QS believed that the number of applicants might drop, whereas 26% thought the number would remain the same. The institutions were asked how often they were contacting their international students with information related to coronavirus, with 39% responding that they were reaching out to students a few times a week, however, 4% said that they were not contacting students specifically regarding coronavirus. Student mobility and global university partnerships have been significantly impacted by the coronavirus pandemic as well.Hosting recruitment events or sending representatives to international courses is also not possible considering the air-travel restrictions placed all over the globe. 

At least 50% of the participants surveyed believe that the number of applicants can drop, whereas 26% think the number will remain the same

These are most certainly trying times for universities and students across the globe. The uncertainty around the pandemic is making it difficult for the world to impart and pursue education. However, as the world battles the new virus, universities are taking measures to ensure that education remains uninterrupted.

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